Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2008 No 2

Public Financing of Religious Schools: James G. Blaine and Justice Clarence Thomas' 'Bigotry Thesis'

Kern Alexander,  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, US

 

Fundamentalism and the Lost Art of Islamic Hermeneutics

Chogollah Maroufi, California State University, US

 

The Intersection of School Desegregation and Economic Globalization in America

Frank Brown, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, US

Public Financing of Religious Schools: James G. Blaine and Justice Clarence Thomas' 'Bigotry Thesis'

Kern Alexander,  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, US

Alexander_K.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [354.1 KB]

Fundamentalism and the Lost Art of Islamic Hermeneutics

Chogollah Maroufi, California State University, US

This paper attempts to explore epistemological dispositions of Islamic fundamentalism and its ramifications. One major assumption of this paper is that there exists an epistemic stagnation among Muslims in general, exacerbated by an inflexibility of fundamentalists’ epistemic stance. The latter two epistemic dispositions seem to slow down Islam’s progress into the modern world in general, and scholarly and critical studies in Islam in particular. The idea of ijtihad, which has been abandoned by Sunnis and still being practiced in a half-hearted measure by Shiites, is used in this paper as both an exemplary epistemic practice and as a metaphor to formulate a conceptual epistemic plan for an open-ended and non-restrictive practice of religious interpretation and hermeneutics.
Maroufi_C.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [461.0 KB]

The Intersection of School Desegregation and Economic Globalization in America

Frank Brown, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, US

Public education in America continues to be view as being worthy of major investments to improve the county’s economic position in the world. But quality education for many Americans is still not within their reach.1 Fifty years after the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education2 eliminating legal segregation of public education by race the country is still a long ways from realizing quality education for all of its citizens3. Retired Federal Court of Appeals Judge Robert L. Carter,4 who argued the Brown case in admits that Brown did not achieve its goals. He feels that this generation must ensure that the Brown principles become a reality all children have an equal opportunity to a quality education in their respective communities; and the country increasingly dep
Brown.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [269.7 KB]

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