Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

volume 2020 no 2

Exploring The Perceived Effectiveness Of Brand Awareness Strategies Of A Selected Private Higher Education Institution

Bernadette Kruger, Lecturer, Southern Business School, South Africa

 

Evolving Library Space & Services: Applied Nexus Learning

Anthony J. Frisby, Senior Associate Provost and Les Sztandera, Professor, Thomas Jefferson University, US

 

Diversity in the Digital Age: Integrating Pedagogy and Technology for Equity And Inclusion

Kathryn de Groof Kaiser, Primary Division Director, Teachers College, Columbia University, US

 

Teacher-Student Connections in the Elementary School

Kenneth Reimer, Assistant Professor, University of Winnipeg, Canada

 

Manto: Narratives of Gendered Sexual Violence in Pakistan Pre and Post- Partition

Sadia Uddin, Ph.D. Candidate, York University, Canada

 

An Analysis of the Relationship Between John and the Synoptics: Critiquing Percival Gardner-Smith’s Saint John and the Synoptic Gospels

Caleb Cooke, Student, Duke University, US

 

COMMENTARY

Will the COVID-19 Experience Forever Alter the Educational Experience for Law Students?

Klint W. Alexander, Dean, University of Wyoming, College of Law, US

Exploring The Perceived Effectiveness of Brand Awareness Strategies of a Selected Private Higher Education Institution

Bernadette Kruger, Lecturer, Southern Business School, South Africa

Higher education institutions (HEIs) play a pivotal role in the education of a nation with its capacity to create and transfer contemporary knowledge. The sustainability of HEIs depends to a large extent on its brand and ability to deliver quality education. Branding is of particular value to a distance school in an already overcrowded and complicated market place. Schools use branding as a tool, in the sense that it simplifies and steers the customer’s choice of an institution. The main objective of this research was to explore the perceived effectiveness of the brand awareness strategies of a selected private higher education institution.
The study was quantitative in nature. Data was collected from various stakeholders of the selected private higher education institution (N=150). The
Kruger_B .pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [426.5 KB]

Evolving Library Space & Services: Applied Nexus Learning

Anthony J. Frisby and Les Sztandera, Thomas Jefferson University, US

Academic library designs evolve to match the educational philosophy and practices of their home institutions. Nexus Learning – our university’s signature pedagogy – actively engages all learners in a collaborative approach to solving real-world problems and uses a humanistic approach to designing effective solutions. Three student teams used this methodology to assess the current use of a large, primarily undergraduate library and propose a re-imagined library space that meets the needs of the current academic community.
Frisby_Sztandera.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [346.4 KB]

Diversity in the Digital Age: Integrating Pedagogy and Technology for Equity and Inclusion

Kathryn de Groof Kaiser, Primary Division Director, Teachers College, Columbia University, US

This study explores the perceptions of how and why teachers might integrate technology to support their goals of equity and inclusion with a group of teachers who identify as culturally responsive in their pedagogy and describe themselves as fluent in the use of technology in school. Teachers working with students of diverse backgrounds were chosen purposively using an “extreme case sampling” method in order to interview experienced and pedagogically aligned participants. Drawing on in-depth interviews, a review of class artifacts and documents, and a focus group, this study provides critical insights into how self-identified culturally relevant teachers use technology. Discussion of the findings focused on how the unique affordances of technology lend themselves as a critical resource
Kaiser_K.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [554.3 KB]

Teacher-Student Connections in the Elementary School

Kenneth Reimer, Assistant Professor, University of Winnipeg, Canada

The purpose of this study, conducted in 2018, was to invite Manitoba elementary school classroom teachers into a think tank and ask them what they believe they do to connect with students in their classroom. I found that the elementary school classroom teachers who participated in the study believed that connecting with their students was a very important component of their job. The participants strived to find creative ways to connect with students by:
1. Attempting to meet students’ needs;
2. Empowering students to express themselves and discover their own interests;
3. Incorporating what they learned from students into their daily interactions and the curricula; and
4. Creating opportunities for shared experiences.
The study concludes that elementary teacher practices for teacher-stu
Reimer_K.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [372.1 KB]

Manto: Narratives of Gendered Sexual Violence in Pakistan Pre and Post- Partition

Sadia Uddin, Ph.D. Candidate, York University, Canada

When considering the ways in which we contextualise and process the past, it is imperative to locate how identity-based politics have contributed to the ongoing disciplining of women. Postcolonial literature critiquing the state-backed moral regulation of women in Pakistan has been subjected to censorship through religious propaganda and state control. This paper will examine the works of ‘controversial’ Urdu short story writer Saadat Hasan Manto (1912-1955). Manto’s works addressed the gendered sexual violence of the Partition, which created the independent states of India and Pakistan in 1947. As women were inextricably linked to notions of ‘honour’ and ‘nationhood,’ their bodies became the site of sexual violence. This paper reflects on Pakistan’s creation as a separate
Uddin_S.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [327.4 KB]

An Analysis of the Relationship Between John and the Synoptics: Critiquing Percival Gardner-Smith’s Saint John and the Synoptic Gospels

Caleb Cooke, Student, Duke University, US

Percival Gardner-Smith’s Saint John and the Synoptic Gospels inspired a revolution among New Testament scholars by calling into question the existing findings of past scholars. According to Gardner-Smith, his “fresh examination” proves that there is no literary relationship between John and the Synoptics; instead, the relationship is better described as sharing attributes originating in a common “basin of oral tradition.” To indicate what the primary evidence as a whole indicates regarding the relationship between John and the Synoptics, I examined the Greek text of each gospel, making note of distinctive overlaps that prove John’s dependence on the Synoptics; simultaneously, I critiqued Gardner-Smith’s handling of the primary evidence of the Greek text. Upon examination of G
Cooke_C.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [437.2 KB]

Will the COVID-19 Experience Forever Alter the Educational Experience for Law Students?

Klint W. Alexander, Dean, University of Wyoming, College of Law, US

Since the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States, the vast majority of US law schools have suspended in-person classes and moved to on-line classes in an effort to slow the spread of the virus. Law professors have been experimenting with on-line classes via zoom or skype to make law school available to students who are practicing social distancing or under stay-at-home orders during this emergency period. This temporary move to on-line classes has provided important insights into the advantages and disadvantages of on-line legal education programs and how these programs stack up against traditional in-person, bricks and mortar learnin
Alexander_K.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [189.1 KB]

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