Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

volume 2019 no 2 

Complex Adaptive Systems Theory and The Tau Conceptual Framework for Understanding Healthcare and Human Services in the United States

Kenneth D. Gossett, Colorado State University Global Campus, Jared D. Padgett, University of Phoenix, Shelly M. Pierce, Southern Illinois Healthcare, and Joni L. Scott, Cleveland Clinic, US

 

Accounting for Context: Rethinking Accountability Policy Pedagogically

Stefan Becks, University of Vienna, Austria

 

A Comparison of Pedagogy in China and USA Classrooms

John Donnellan and Michael Edmondson, New Jersey City University, US

 

An Economic Analysis of the Gender Gap in Household Demand for Education: Evidence from India

Suparna Das, Central European University, Hungary

 

Exploring Religiosity, Spirituality, Faith, and the Sacred in Chinese and Taiwanese Cultures

Eric P. Boorman, Morgan State University, Steven E Handwerker, The International Association for the Advancement of Human Welfare, Inc. and Chun-Han Chen, University of Houston, US

Complex Adaptive Systems Theory and The Tau Conceptual Framework for Understanding Healthcare and Human Services in the United States

Kenneth D. Gossett, Colorado State University Global Campus, Jared D. Padgett, University of Phoenix, Shelly M. Pierce, Southern Illinois Healthcare, and Joni L. Scott, Cleveland Clinic, US

Complex Adaptive Systems Theory and The Tau Conceptual Framework for Understanding Healthcare and Human Services in the United States
Educators applied complexity sciences to analyze healthcare and human services in a complex adaptive system (CAS), which supported the need to restructure services to sustain the goals of the healthcare continuum. CAS theory introduces new perspectives for leaders challenged with meeting inconsistent and seemingly contradictory healthcare mandates. CAS theory enabled identification of variables directly or inversely related based on the direction of their feedback loops and system behaviors from evidence-based research findings. The authors explored the benefits of using this approach as a learning tool for students and faculty engaged in healthcare research and as an evaluation method for healthcare leaders to improve outcomes.
This exploratory review resulted in the development of the Ta
Gossett et al..pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [1.1 MB]

Accounting for Context: Rethinking Accountability Policy Pedagogically

Stefan Becks, University of Vienna, Austria

Accounting for Context: Rethinking Accountability Policy Pedagogically
In this article, I contribute to the critical discussion of current test-based accountability policies in schooling. Based on Daniel Koretz’ analysis of standardised testing as a basis for accountability, I argue that standardised testing can be viable tools for school development if used correctly. These tests carry no information on the causes of low test results since they cannot take into account the contexts in which these results were measured. In order to implement meaningful change, knowledge of schools’ contexts is paramount. I conclude, therefore, that while standardised tests may be useful to identify schools in need of support, it is vital to determine exactly how this support should look like, in immediate cooperation with the people involved in those schools.
Becks.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [180.7 KB]

A Comparison of Pedagogy in China and USA Classrooms

John Donnellan and Michael Edmondson, New Jersey City University, US

A Comparison of Pedagogy in China and USA Classrooms
This research paper presents new findings in pedagogy as the result of a comparison of different teachings/learning styles in higher education at schools from China and USA. This study examined project-based teaching and learning at undergraduate business courses over three years. Both universities had similar business case studies, and results were tabulated comparing critical thinking as an outcome. Numerous teams of students reviewed and conducted research on the problem and presented an analysis or solution to the problem. From a research standpoint little has been published to compare specific classroom teaching/learning styles between higher education in China and USA; thus, this paper presents an argument that learning outcomes are influenced by cultural and pre-college education di
Donnellan and Edmondson.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [347.6 KB]

An Economic Analysis of the Gender Gap in Household Demand for Education: Evidence from India

Suparna Das, Central European University, Hungary

An Economic Analysis of the Gender Gap in Household Demand for Education: Evidence from India
Education plays a crucial role in building tomorrow’s human capital, and thus, it is an essential tool for economic growth and development. Following the second Millennium Development Goal's (MDG) (2000) call for achieving universal school education by 2015, extensive government initiatives with special emphasis on girls were undertaken in India. Access to education has shown tremendous progress and became successful in bringing almost all potential pupils to primary (standard I-V) school. However, starting from the elementary (standard VI-VIII) level onwards the gender gap in enrollment persists and widens with the level of education in India.
This paper quantifies the gender difference in enrollment decisions for children and provides a theoretical structure to the underlying demand-si
Das.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [438.2 KB]

Exploring Religiosity, Spirituality, Faith, and the Sacred in Chinese and Taiwanese Cultures

Eric P. Boorman, Morgan State University, Steven E Handwerker, The International Association for the Advancement of Human Welfare, Inc. and Chun-Han Chen, University of Houston, US

Exploring Religiosity, Spirituality, Faith, and the Sacred in Chinese and Taiwanese Cultures
The Meaningful Existence Scale is an 18-item instrument designed to explore four critical constructs central to meaning: religiosity, spirituality, faith, and the sacred. The relationship and composition of these factors were studied in two Asian populations, specifically Taiwan and China. Data analyses revealed that participants indicate a deeper nature and connection to the Divine.
Given the consistency of these factors across cultures, said factors could be conceptualized as universal elements which shape the experience of meaning in life. Despite the universal importance of these factors across various cultures, the manifestation of said does change within these Asian cultures.
Boorman et al.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [421.1 KB]

 

 

 

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