Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2019 No 4

Feminist History and Feminism and the Future

Rachel Fernflores, California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, US

 

Transgender Students and Sex-Segregated Facilities: Why School Leaders Might Rethink Litigation 

Suzanne Eckes, Indiana University, US

 

An Eco-feminist Approach to Reproductive Oppression

Hannah Brooks, University of Cincinnati College of Law, US

 

Bypass the Glass Ceiling: Texas Women Disrupt Traditional Male-Dominated Business Models

Cynthia Marshall Devlin, Stephen F. Austin State University, US

 

The Effectiveness of the “Work on What Works Approach” in School Settings: A Pilot Study Conducted in Albania

Valbona Hoxha, Sigmund Freud University, Austria

 

Latinos Not Engaging in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Careers

Luz V. Garcia-Felix, Columbia University, US

 

COMMENTARY

Women’s Enduring Leadership

Pauline Nugent, Missouri State University, US

Feminist History and Feminism and the Future

Rachel Fernflores, California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, US

Feminist activists and scholars can benefit from understanding and drawing from the history of feminist thought and action. In all disciplines, scholars recognize the value of understanding history. We can draw from both the successes and the failures of history. One possible exception is feminist action and thought. The ahistorical approach each new generation of feminists seem to take to action and theory is regrettable. It mirrors the absence of women’s struggles and accomplishments in traditional history books. It ignores the leadership and courage of past feminists from whom we can learn. It prevents feminist scholars from adopting a common purpose that will allow feminism to finally address the criticisms that it is not an inclusive movement, but instead, one riddled with classism
Fernflores_R.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [313.0 KB]

Transgender Students and Sex-Segregated Facilities: Why School Leaders Might Rethink Litigation 

Suzanne Eckes, Indiana University, US

There have been at least ten court cases involving transgender students who have alleged that school districts have engaged in discriminatory practices when the students were not permitted to use the restroom that aligned with their gender identities. All of these cases have generally ended in a favorable outcome for the transgender students. Not every jurisdiction has examined this issue, however. Thus, some school districts do not have existing precedent to rely upon when creating school policy involving restroom access for transgender students.
This article examines a recent case involving a school district that continued to defend a lawsuit involving a transgender student who sought to use the restroom that aligned with his gender identity. The outcome of this 2019 federal district
Eckes_S.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [442.2 KB]

An Eco-feminist Approach to Reproductive Oppression

Hannah Brooks, University of Cincinnati College of Law, US

Although there are established international measures to ensure women have access to standard levels of healthcare, those standards are relative to the accessibility within each respective nation and there currently exists no impetus to heighten the quality of that standard of care on a global level. This is particularly evident in those places commonly referred to as the “developing world”. There are cultural ideologies and norms within the vast majority of developed nations which demonstrate a pervasive desire to seek control of resources and allocate them based on an understood value assigned to the recipient, rather than recipient need; a value which is often, if not always, determined by ability to create profit. Within this profit-centered structure there cannot be any genuine r
Brooks_H.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [383.9 KB]

Bypass the Glass Ceiling: Texas Women Disrupt Traditional Male-Dominated Business Models

Cynthia Marshall Devlin, Stephen F. Austin State University, US

The proverbial “glass ceiling” historically prevented women from reaching the top strata of American business, but many Texas women carved their own futures by avoiding the traditional path to the board room. This paper uses business journals, census information, Texas history books, and interviews to reach such a conclusion. The result is a historical study with an anthropological twist. By 2018 Texas women had established such a vital niche through their own entrepreneurial activities that the state tied for second in the nation as a best place for women-owned firms. The process by which women gained equality in a state that identified with cowboys, oil wildcatters, roughnecks, and Texas Rangers proved snail-paced primarily because men with cultural vestiges of a warrior ethos domin
Devlin_C.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [409.7 KB]

The Effectiveness of the “Work on What Works Approach” in School Settings: A Pilot Study Conducted in Albania

Valbona Hoxha, Sigmund Freud University, Austria

The impact of the teacher’s personal characteristics and communication style has been identified among other factors in the educational research area as one important factor that could bring changes to students’ academic and emotional development. This study aims to investigate the impact of teacher communication style on pupil behavior, focusing on discipline, responsibility, and cooperation. In particular, it focuses on the Work on What Works (WOWW) approach as a method of communication that promises to bring positive changes to the pupils. This program is delivered to three groups of fourth and fifth graders, between nine and eleven years old, who were randomly selected from a mainstream school in Tirana, Albania. A political and social authoritarian system historically characterize
Hoxha_V.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [407.9 KB]

Latinos Not Engaging in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Careers

Luz V. Garcia-Felix, Columbia University, US

The US Census Bureau records the Latino identifying population in the United States (US) as the largest and fastest-growing racial/ethnic group in the US and predicts that by 2060, a quarter of the total population in America will be Latinos. In 2010 the U.S. National Center for Education Statistics reported that the educational performance of Latinos in public schools lag behind Whites in mathematics and reading scores. The US Education system focus on teaching future generations for the advancement of the world by preparing students for careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). It is thus vital to understand the factors that contribute to Latinos’education problems. This is addressed in an extensive literature review.
The purpose of this paper is to b
Garcia-Felix_L.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [893.0 KB]

COMMENTARY

Women’s Enduring Leadership

Pauline Nugent, Missouri State University, US

At the moment in world history, when the Me Too Movement occupies a central stage in the social arena, an international conference should devote its attention to the significant contributions of women who have been largely excised from the annals of history. This paper strives to correct that imbalance by surveying a few select females briefly before concentrating attention on one extraordinarily gifted female who flourished in the intellectual and spiritual world of the 12th century and who is currently experiencing a new and refreshing revival, with a unique relevance and challenge for women in the 21st century. Her name is Hildegard of Bingen. The primary outcome of this reflective address is to challenge and enable women everywhere to own their unique and special gifts to make society
Nugent_P.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [296.5 KB]

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