Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2011 No 3

A Who is the Culprit? Terrorism and its Roots: Victims (Israelis) and Victims (Palestinians) in Light of Jacques Derrida's Philosophical Deconstruction and Edward Said's Literary Criticism

Husain Kassim, University of Central Florida, US

 

Fear, Flight, Frustration and Dedicated Service: A Brief History of International Disease Control Activities, 1918-2008

Heather MacDougall,  University of Waterloo, Canada

 

Religion Policy and the Faith-Based Initiative: Navigating the Shifting Boundaries between Church and State

Michael D. McGinnis, Indiana University, Bloomington, US

A Who is the Culprit? Terrorism and its Roots: Victims (Israelis) and Victims (Palestinians) in Light of Jacques Derrida's Philosophical Deconstruction and Edward Said's Literary Criticism

Husain Kassim, University of Central Florida, US

Terrorism, however it is defined, has come to be associated with the Middle East and Muslim world without taking into consideration a wider and broader perspective of its origins in the context of Western hegemony of the past, present and future. The entire blame is thrown upon the Middle East and Muslim world rather than looking deeper into the past of the Western history of victimizing people. A case in point is the people of Israel and Palestine. Looking at the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians and its history, it becomes clear that the cause of terrorism has very little to do with the violent nature of Middle Eastern countries, including Israel and its religious fundamentalism. This fact is not taken into account even by Jacques Derrida’s and Edward Said. This article revis
Kassim_H.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [334.2 KB]

Fear, Flight, Frustration and Dedicated Service: A Brief History of International Disease Control Activities, 1918-2008

Heather MacDougall,  University of Waterloo, Canada

Comparing and contrasting the history of local, national and international efforts to control pandemic influenza in 1918-20 and SARS in 2003 provides an opportunity to assess the impact of disease on the international order. The great flu pandemic of 1918-20 occurred at the end of the First World War and highlighted the lack of well-organised public health services around the world. It also prompted sustained scientific research to determine the viral nature of influenza. In 1948, the World Health Organization was created as an international data collection agency whose role was to provide information in advance of disease outbreaks as well as to work to eradicate malaria, smallpox, polio and HIV/AIDS. But persuading member states to report outbreaks of communicable diseases was never easy
Macdougall_H.doc.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [438.7 KB]

Religion Policy and the Faith-Based Initiative: Navigating the Shifting Boundaries between Church and State

Michael D. McGinnis, Indiana University, Bloomington, US

Despite widespread presumption of a wall of separation between church and state, boundaries between the activities of religious and policy organizations in the United States are fluid and endlessly renegotiated. Faith-based organizations (FBOs) are full participants in complex policy networks in some policy areas (health, education, and social services), while in other issue areas FBOs have minimal if any impact. Government policies at national, state, and local levels directly or indirectly manipulate the incentives and disincentives of believers’ participation in policy-relevant activities.
Religion policy encompasses a wide array of policy instruments (or policy tools), and this paper identifies the key determinants of diverse patterns of relationships among the leaders of religious
Mcginnis_M.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [537.4 KB]

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