Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2011 No 2

The Contemporary Ways of Waging a War on Terrorism: The Case of the USA, the EU and the UN

Piotr Czachorowski, The University of Gdansk, Poland

 

The Legacy of Darwin in the Land of Robert Frost

Nancy Nahrah,  Champlain College, US

 

Labor and 'The Wealth of Nations'

David H. Plowman and Chriss Perryer MacDougall,  The University of Western Australia, Australia

 

Malevolent Employees and Their Effect on the Ethical Culture of Business Organizations

Gay Lyn Spencer and Donald T. Wargo,  Temple University, US

The Contemporary Ways of Waging a War on Terrorism: The Case of the USA, the EU and the UN

Piotr Czachorowski, The University of Gdansk, Poland

Almost a decade after the attacks of September 11, 2001, terrorism has become more varied, complicated and difficult to understand. The world faces an array of different kinds of terrorist threat. Some are extremely dangerous; others pose a risk on a smaller scale. Some are genuinely global; others are purely regional or local. The most difficult form to combat is transnational terrorism, especially that connected with radical Islamist extremist violence. These terrorists possess a desire to kill on the grand scale. The violence for them is not a means of forcing an opponent into negotiations and incremental concessions but a sanctified activity that aims at massive change. In the near-term there is little prospect that the threat from this form of terrorism will diminish, especially since
Czachorowski_P.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [275.8 KB]

The Legacy of Darwin in the Land of Robert Frost

Nancy Nahrah,  Champlain College, US

The discussion of Religion and Science easily and conventionally situates itself in the context of religious considerations or in that of science, in either case lending itself to a discussion of tests of various kinds tending toward attempts at proof or arguments setting out to disprove the necessity or validity of such proofs as are proposed. Rather than relying on either of these approaches, this essay proposes a means of opening up the discussion by repositioning its center and relying, in fact, on what must accurately be described as an eccentric view, that is to say, a view from outside the center. The third place used here has, in its own tradition, been associated at times with science and at times with religion, which suggests its suitability for use now in the hope that it does n
Nahra_N.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [302.2 KB]

Labor and 'The Wealth of Nations'

David H. Plowman and Chriss Perryer MacDougall,  The University of Western Australia, Australia

Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations (WN) has been an important point of departure for much economic literature and debate. As Coates (1975: 218) has observed, a ‘multitude of ideologists and propagandists have cited him in support of their polemic campaigns’ while ‘innumerable scholars have sought to comprehend the meaning of his writings and to assess their significance for Smith’s own and subsequent epochs’. Though the WN has influenced classical and other schools of thought, for much of its life it has been associated with neoclassical economics, homo economicus, and ‘little more than a single principle that all trade should be free’ (Rothschild: 2001: 67). However, over the last 30 years, there have been important re-interpretations of the work which has shown the WN to be
Plowman_Perryer.doc.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [383.9 KB]

Malevolent Employees and Their Effect on the Ethical Culture of Business Organizations

Gay Lyn Spencer and Donald T. Wargo,  Temple University, US

Robert D. Hare is arguably the world’s foremost expert on psychopaths. He has spent his entire career examining and interacting with psychopaths in prison, in the general population and in corporate settings. His Psychopathy Checklist—Revised (‘PCL:R’) is considered the “gold standard” clinical scale for diagnosing psychopaths. Unfortunately, Hare reports from his work with business executives that approximately 3.5% of executives would be diagnosed as ‘psychopaths’. However, the mere existence of these individuals in an organization is not the worst part. Psychopaths cause havoc, financial losses and morale problems in a company by ‘leveraging their evil. The negative effects of 3.5% of malevolent individuals (psychopaths) in business organizations are multiple. Not only
Spencer_Wargo.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [624.9 KB]

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