Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2016 No 3

Circle of Sensibility: How Spiritual Type Theory Informs an Understanding of Patterns and Preferences in Christian Spirituality

Samuel E. Baker, Corban University, US

 

Examining Leader Behaviors of Kindergarten Students during Peer Learning

Elisabeth A. Mlawski, Monmouth University and Alexis Cattano, Monmouth University, US

 

Using Formative Spirituality to Develop Self Awareness and Faith with Incarcerated and Adolescent Populations

Carole Ann Riley, Duquesne University, and Elaine Kay Soper, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, US

 

The MOOC Revolution: The Search for Revenues and its Implications for Higher Education

Gayle Allard, IE Business School, Madrid and John Bolorinos, University of California, Davis, US

 

Principals and Teacher Leaders Co-Constructing Theories in Practice: Empowerment and Accountability Exchanged

Janet Hurt, Western Kentucky University, and Marguerita DeSander, Western Kentucky University, US

 

Women in Top Managerial Positions

Anna Górska, Akademia Leona Koźmińskiego, Poland

 

Where the Jordan Meets the Ganges: Swami Vivekananda and the Confluence of East/West Culture

Louella Moore, Washburn School of Business, US

 

State Support for Religion: An Autonomy-based Approach

Leni Franken, University of Antwerp, Belgium

 

Parenting Style and Child Happiness: Evidence from Japan

Yuko Nozaki, Institute for Future Engineering, and Katsumi Matsuura, Hiroshima University, Japan

 

Winnicott Goes to School: Examining Early Psychological Development to Inform Infant/Toddler and Pre-school Practice

Frances J. Rofrano, Lehman College, City University of New York, US

Circle of Sensibility: How Spiritual Type Theory Informs an Understanding of Patterns and Preferences in Christian Spirituality

Samuel E. Baker, Corban University, US

This paper compares spiritual typologies found in antiquated and present-day expressions of Christian faith, drawing on a framework embedded in historical and contextual models of apophatic and kataphatic taxonomies. Understanding individual and corporate typological traits of expressed spirituality, along with patterns and preferences of sacred and spiritual engagements, will ultimately promote a broader appreciation of differing historical traditions and relevant explanations of practices found in current faith communities. In recent years, researchers have designed and applied various models to investigate and explain these preference-based representations of Christian spirituality. Spiritual type theory takes advantage of this phenomenological explanation, delineating a concise overvie
Baker_S.pdf
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Examining Leader Behaviors of Kindergarten Students during Peer Learning

Elisabeth A. Mlawski, Monmouth University and Alexis Cattano, Monmouth University, US

Peers working with peers have become an essential component of the learning process as mandated by the Common Core State Standards beginning as early as when children enter kindergarten. Children should be grouped according to the types of behaviors they naturally exhibit when working with a peer to optimize learning that occurs throughout dyadic interactions. The purpose of this paper is to describe the leader behaviors kindergarten children exhibited when working with a peer and identify how to optimize the behaviors when grouping children for peer learning.
Important implications of this research included the identification of leaders as the student who was more verbal and used positive behaviors that demonstrated social competence. Identifying these behaviors will help teachers thought
Mlawski_Cattano.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [395.6 KB]

Using Formative Spirituality to Develop Self Awareness and Faith with Incarcerated and Adolescent Populations

Carole Ann Riley, Duquesne University, and Elaine Kay Soper, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, US

Using qualitative research as formulated by Adrian Van Kaam in the Science of Formative Spirituality, the researchers studied his reflective methodology’s impact on incarcerated women volunteering for a formation group and college adolescents (18-19-year-olds) engaged in service learning activity and subsequent reflection. Reflecting on life’s experience can take many forms. Two constructs of van Kaam’s Formation Science paradigm are adapted for this project, namely, the formation field and the dimensions of the self.
The formation field represents a type of field theory. The dimensions of the self, describe an anthropology of the person. This study adapted these two constructs to investigate if reflection on life experiences using the Science of Formation Science paradigm facilitate
Riley_ Soper.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [409.2 KB]

The MOOC Revolution: The Search for Revenues and its Implications for Higher Education

Gayle Allard, IE Business School, Madrid and John Bolorinos, University of California, Davis, US

The world of higher education has been transformed by the advent of Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs offered both by traditional universities and by independent MOOC providers such as Coursera and Udacity. As these MOOCs evolve, providers are experimenting with ways to generate revenue while still adhering to their vision of making education accessible to students everywhere and in all phases of life. What business model they settle on will have implications for the financing of traditional higher education. This paper will summarize the revenue sources of the largest MOOC providers today and draw some conclusions and implications for the higher education sector.
Allard_Bolorinos.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [544.4 KB]

Principals and Teacher Leaders Co-Constructing Theories in Practice: Empowerment and Accountability Exchanged

Janet Hurt, Western Kentucky University, and Marguerita DeSander, Western Kentucky University, US

The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which principal and teacher leaders at four purposefully selected schools collaboratively developed theories in practice related to the exchange between empowerment and accountability envisioned by education reform researchers. The researchers posited the trade-off between empowerment and responsibility would never occur without the principal and teacher leaders forming a consensus-building group and co-developing theories in practice as the basis for improving schools. Two research questions guided this investigation: (a) To what extent were principal espoused theories in practice and modeled behaviors congruent; and (b) To what extent did the principal and teacher leaders co-develop theories in practice related to the trade-off betwe
Hurt_DeSander.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [466.8 KB]

Women in Top Managerial Positions

Anna Górska, Akademia Leona Koźmińskiego, Poland

In this project, the author attempts to answer the question of how the perception of leaders change depending on the gender of the leader and how this perception influences the employability of women in higher positions. An experiment was conducted to find out whether there are differences in recruitment and gender-based biases. This study based the experiment on the random distribution of the curriculum vitae (CV) of a male and a female. All gender identifiers were removed from the CVs. The CVs were presented to MBA students who are managers that specialize in recruitment. The results showed that the female CV was received differently compared to that of the male CV. Among the barriers a female face within organizations, the experiment revealed that gender inequality appears at the phase
Górska_A.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [438.3 KB]

Where the Jordan Meets the Ganges: Swami Vivekananda and the Confluence of East/West Culture

Louella Moore, Washburn School of Business, US

While it is common to categorize Eastern and Western culture using quantitative scales, modern researchers are beginning to view culture as a fluid oceanic commodity that cannot be entirely captured without reference to the dynamic context. This paper uses a central event, Swami Vivekananda's participation in the 1983 Chicago World Parliament of Religions to explore the confluence of cultures as played out both before and after Swami Vivekananda's lecture tours to the West. Vivekananda played a pivotal role in a global mixing of disciplines as diverse as philosophy, literature, education, physical science, social service, and organizational theory that has perhaps not been adequately appreciated outside the Indian continent. Vivekananda's lectures in the West are used as a focal point to
Moore_L.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [496.7 KB]

State Support for Religion: An Autonomy-based Approach

Leni Franken, University of Antwerp, Belgium

In the first part of this article, I will argue that it is, within a liberal framework, possible to give a neutral or anti perfectionists legitimation for state support for 'valuable options' or 'perfectionist goods.' After a critical elaboration of autonomy-based liberalism as defended by Raz and Kymlicka, it has been argued that state support for these goods can be allowed as a second-best option in order to guarantee equal access to an adequate range of valuable options, which is a necessary condition for autonomy (cf. Ben Colburn).
In the second part, I will focus on religion and argue that religion is a perfectionist good. Accordingly, state support for religion is allowed, but not required by justice, and this kind of support should only be allowed in order to guarantee equal access
Franken_L.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [359.2 KB]

Parenting Style and Child Happiness: Evidence from Japan

Yuko Nozaki, Institute for Future Engineering, and Katsumi Matsuura, Hiroshima University, Japan

Raising happy children is the ultimate goal for parents. What makes children happy? In this paper, we examine how early-life risks, which refer to various factors outside the control of the child, influence child happiness, and what factors override these risks by analyzing the longitudinal Survey of Newborns in the 21st Century in Japan. Extreme parenting styles have adverse effects on the emotionally healthy development of young children. Conversely, maternal labor supply improves it. The empirical results show that valuing opportunities for interaction with both friends and parents can mitigate these early- life risks.
Nozaki_Matsuura.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [916.9 KB]

Winnicott Goes to School: Examining Early Psychological Development to Inform Infant/Toddler and Pre-school Practice

Frances J. Rofrano, Lehman College, City University of New York, US

Winnicott's theory of infant psychological development is explored to determine how it can inform the preparation of infant/toddler and preschool teacher candidates. The author examines Winnicott's theory of the psychological stages of dependence to determine how it can provide the knowledge necessary for teachers to establish psychologically appropriate classroom practices in early care settings. A major implication for infant/toddler teachers is the creation of a facilitating environment for infant/mother dyads. Implications for preschool teachers are shown to rest in the knowledge that preschool children are on a continuum moving back and forth between these stages of dependence as they transition into school, wrapping up former stages of development to be who they are now. The author
Rofrano_F.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [397.5 KB]

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