Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2015 No 3

Spirituality in School Counseling Practice and Implications for School Counseling Education

Russell G. Yocum, Richard J. Silvey, Frederick A. Milacci, and Fernando L. Garzon, Liberty University, US

 

Exploring the Concept of 'Thick Description' of the Relgio-Moral Economy of Penal Transportation: A Micro-study of a Vandemonian Moment 1821

Richard Ely, University of Tasmania and University of Melbourne, Australia

 

A Brave New World: The Rights of the Disabled to an Even Playing Field in High Stakes Testing

Melani Lea Proctor, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Northern District of California, US

 

"Feminigenocide:" Or the Effacement of Women in the Genocidal Experience

Sarah Gendron, Marquette University, US

Law and Ethics: A Necessary Complementarity to Increase Women’s Presence in Business Managerial Positions

Maria Medina-Vicent, University Jaume I, Spain

Disruptive Women – Social Entrepreneurs with a Mission to Change the Face of Business

Denise Kleinrichert, San Francisco State University, US

 

The Sacrifice of God in the Vedas and Christianity

M. Krzysztof Byrski, Collegium Civitas, Poland

 

Sacrifice as Final Gamble: Abraham's Offering His Son and Buddha's Giving His Body

David L. Weddle, Colorado College, US

 

Centered Leadership: The Resilience and Power of the Female Spirit in T. Obinkaram Echewa's I Saw the Sky Catch Fire

Christine N. Ohale, Chicago State University, US

 

Understanding Change and Changeability: The Ethics of Disagreement in Islamic Thought

Md Yousuf Ali, International Islamic University, Malaysia 

Spirituality in School Counseling Practice and Implications for School Counseling Education

Russell G. YocumRichard J. SilveyFrederick A. Milacci, and Fernando L. Garzon, Liberty University, US

The researchers employed qualitative means to arrive at a phenomenological understanding of pre-service school counselors’ knowledge and integration of spirituality in counseling practice to address the research questions: (a) What do pre-service school counselors know about the integration of spirituality in the school counseling field?, (b) How would pre-service school counselors react to scenarios regarding students’ spiritual needs? and (c) What additional training and resources concerning the integration of spirituality in the school counseling field would pre-service school counselors find useful? A purposeful selection was applied to a convenience sample of pre-service school counselors enrolled in a graduate-level “Structured Groups” course at a large, private, non-profit
Yocum_Silvey_Milacci_Garzon .pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [541.8 KB]

Exploring the Concept of 'Thick Description' of the Relgio-Moral Economy of Penal Transportation: A Micro-study of a Vandemonian Moment 1821

Richard Ely, University of Tasmania and University of Melbourne, Australia

This article explores the metaphor’ thick Description’ in a micro-study of the execution of ten convicts on April 28, 1821, in Hobart, Van Diemen’s Land. ‘Thick description,’ contrasted with ‘thin,’ is a metaphor promoted by the English philosopher Gilbert Ryle, and applied by American ethnographer Clifford Geertz, as interpretatively helpful, in a witty 1973 anthropological and historical study of certain individual and collective actions in North Africa in 1912. Thickening the description of individual and collective actions, as actions, moves, in Geertz’s hands, beyond describing them as actions done or not, to interpreting them by reference to ends or values, as actions. Geertz, like Ryle, describes this, allusively or metaphorically, as moving from ‘thin’ to ‘thi
Ely_R.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [412.8 KB]

A Brave New World: The Rights of the Disabled to an Even Playing Field in High Stakes Testing

Melani Lea Proctor, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Northern District of California, US

Twenty-five years ago, the United States enacted the Americans with Disabilities Act, designed to provide equal opportunities to people with disabilities. Sixteen years later, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities came into force. This paper will explore the intersection of the A.D.A. and the Convention as they apply to high-stakes standardized testing.
In the first section, the paper will explore the development of American law since the implementation of the A.D.A., with a particular focus on the insertion of a reasonableness requirement into testing accommodations. The second section of the paper will discuss how a selection of member states have implemented the Convention, and whether those countries’ laws provide the same rights their citizens
Proctor_M.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [580.4 KB]

"Feminigenocide:" Or the Effacement of Women in the Genocidal Experience

Sarah Gendron, Marquette University, US

Until the end of the end of the twentieth century, there were few linguistic or legal mechanisms in place for addressing the specificity of women's experience in genocide. The terms Gynocide and Femicide—used loosely to designate a wide variety of acts meant to handicap women, from sex selection, genital mutilation, to female infanticide—were rarely employed to speak of women in genocide. As one might imagine, the original legal definition of the term in the 1948 U.N. Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Genocide did not include sex-identified groups amongst potential victim populations. It was not until 1982 that gender-based violence against women appeared in definitions of genocide. These, in turn, were later eclipsed by the gender-neutral term "Gendercide" which, since th
Gendron_S.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [485.6 KB]

Law and Ethics: A Necessary Complementarity to Increase Women’s Presence in Business Managerial Positions

Maria Medina-Vicent, University Jaume I, Spain

Development of women’s leadership in the economic sphere involves the necessary inclusion of women in senior management positions. In line with this, we can argue that the better gender equality is implemented in companies, the more likely women will be allowed to occupy these positions. Therefore, we highlight two principal ways of achieving egalitarian companies that provide equal work opportunities for both women and men: law and ethics.
The present paper is structured in three parts. Firstly, we approach concepts of law, ethics and morality by identifying their main features and differences. Secondly, we discuss the most important actions that the European Union and the Spanish State are undertaking to promote women’s presence in senior management positions. Thirdly, we focus on d
Medina-Vicent_M.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [344.2 KB]

Disruptive Women – Social Entrepreneurs with a Mission to Change the Face of Business

Denise Kleinrichert, San Francisco State University, US

This paper analyzes the impacts of gender and social entrepreneurship business development. An investigation of the challenges of women social entrepreneurs has not been examined in the academic literature. Women social entrepreneurs develop a small business enterprise focused on a social mission to solve socioeconomic issues. This paper analyzes a niche of these social entrepreneurs who seek to benefit other women specifically.
The reality of gender bias related to women’s abilities to develop small enterprises becomes apparent due to specifically gendered challenges. These challenges include lack of access to venture funding, access to owning property or having economic or political voices. Social entrepreneurs are changing agents using disruptive business practices to stimulate opport
Kleinrichert_D.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [492.0 KB]

The Sacrifice of God in the Vedas and Christianity

M. Krzysztof Byrski, Collegium Civitas, Poland

Three concepts and their relationship to one another within the field of comparative philosophy of religion are explored: the Vedic theology of sacrifice, the sacrifice of Christ and the philosophical implications of the Big Bang theory.
Tapas (burning, tormenting, heat and penance) is a crucial term of the Vedic cosmology. The Rig-Veda states: "What was surrounded by the void that One was born through the power of heat (tapas)." Similarly, the Big Bang is a cosmological phenomenon of physical nature. To Vedic thinkers, consciousness (cit) is the cause of the Big Bang, not its product. For "at the beginning love took in what was the first seed of mind. Thus, the Sages who searched their heart with the hymn found the bond of Being with Non-Being." Love and mind imply a consciousness that
Byrski_M.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [475.5 KB]

Sacrifice as Final Gamble: Abraham's Offering His Son and Buddha's Giving His Body

David L. Weddle, Colorado College, US

This paper seeks to contribute to the formulation of a theory and critique of religious sacrifice by identifying two distinctive characteristics of sacrifices as cost and suspense. Religions require sacrifice as the price of membership in their communities, as a way of marking difference between divine and human, and as a means for humans to participate in divine or transcendent reality. Because sacrifice signifies the sacred, it transcends human values, needs, and desires. Thus sacrificial actions cannot be regulated by rational or moral order—specifically, their effects cannot be reliably predicted. Sacrifices, then, are offered in suspense. I illustrate these broad claims by examining two examples from different cultural contexts and textual traditions: the story of Abraham binding Is
Weddle_D.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [358.1 KB]

Centered Leadership: The Resilience and Power of the Female Spirit in T. Obinkaram Echewa's I Saw the Sky Catch Fire

Christine N. Ohale, Chicago State University, US

Although it is to the African female writers’ credit that the lop-sided depiction of women in African novels has begun to be reversed, some African male authors have established an enduring legacy by focusing attention on women and elevating them as indomitable characters in their novels. One such author is T. Obinkaram Echewa. His book I Saw the Sky Catch Fire extols womanhood and reaches to its depths to unearth the rich deposits of gold buried therein. This novel clearly challenges the popular stereotype that perceives women as marginalized and passive subordinates in a patriarchal culture. Echewa achieves this principally through the stories told by Nne-nne on the eve of her grandson’s departure for studies in America – stories replete with wisdom, determination, resilience and t
Ohale_C.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [402.0 KB]

Understanding Change and Changeability: The Ethics of Disagreement in Islamic Thought

Md Yousuf Ali, International Islamic University, Malaysia 

Disagreement without standard norms and values has become a dangerous trend as a slogan and motto in the contemporary history of human society, particularly in Muslim society. While Islamic scholars have used it as a means of developing Islamic thought and bringing positive socio-cultural and economic-political changes, it has been leveled as extremism/terrorism by politicians and civil society for their political interest or power struggle in contemporary time. Examples of disagreement in bringing changes include; the military administration and Ikhwanul Muslimun disagreement in Egypt, Sunni-Shiite disagreement, changes through the democratic process by the Justice party in Turkey, changes through Islamic revolutionary process in Iran, changes through the democratic process by Ikhwan al-M
Ali_M.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [487.9 KB]

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