Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

volume 2020 no 1

Overcoming Misconception through Emotion: Science Education in Elementary Schools in México

Susana Alicia Alaniz-Álvarez, Yuria Cruz-Alaniz and Angel Francisco Nieto-Samaniego, The National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico

 

Boosting Students’ Interest In Solubility Concept Through the Usage Of 8E Learning Cycle Model-Based Strategy

Mabel Ihuoma Idika, and Francis Adewunmi Adesoji, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

 

A Study of the GLOBE Program and its Impact on Public School Teachers and Their Students

Issa I. Salame, Salim Sabi, Selena Hamid, The City College of New York, US

 

A Comparison Study of Liberation Theory and the Ruhi System

Shahla Mehrgani, Baha’i Institute for Higher Education, Iran

 

Target Language Development for Immigrant Women: Key to Empowerment, Stability, and Growth

Paula M. Wilder, Durham Technical Community College, US

 

Barriers of Reporting Sexual Violence in Syrian Refugee Camps

Emma MacTavish, University of Birmingham, UK

 

Should Pornography be Protected by the Constitution of the United States?

Maggie Calvert, Slippery Rock University, US

Overcoming Misconception through Emotion: Science Education in Elementary Schools in México

Susana Alicia Alaniz-ÁlvarezYuria Cruz-Alaniz and Angel Francisco Nieto-Samaniego, The National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico

It is widely recognized that children can learn science with appropriate teaching. Literature mentions that the main problem in learning science is correcting wrongly held beliefs students had before instruction. In this study, with near 2100 children attending upper elementary school, the objective was to try to see if erroneous preconception inhibited their ability to observe what happens in a scientific experiment correctly. The workshop of ‘initiation to science’ began with a questionnaire that contained eight hypotheses, followed by instruction consisting eight experiments, and finally the same questionnaire to be responded to once the experiments were over. It is known that children try to explain their surroundings, thus arrive at school with preconceptions about the phenomena o
Alaniz-Álvarez and Cruz-Alaniz and Nieto[...]
Adobe Acrobat document [573.7 KB]

Boosting Students’ Interest In Solubility Concept Through the Usage Of 8E Learning Cycle Model-Based Strategy

Mabel Ihuoma Idika, and Francis Adewunmi Adesoji, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

The 8E learning cycle model-based strategy used in this study is an expansion of the 7E model once proposed by Eisenkraft. Although research showed that 7E has a positive effect on a number of students’ learning outcomes, we observed that this model lacks a stage where students’ alternative conceptions are directly addressed; hence, the rationale behind the proposed 8E, which specified an ‘Exhibit’ stage. This study determined the efficacy of an 8E model in boosting students’ interest in the solubility concept. One hundred and eighty-one senior second-year students sampled from four public secondary schools in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria were used for the study. The pre-test, post-test quasi-experimental design was adopted for this study. Two intact classes from two randomly selec
Idika_ Adesoji.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [429.4 KB]

A Study of the GLOBE Program and its Impact on Public School Teachers and Their Students

Issa I. SalameSalim SabiSelena Hamid, The City College of New York, US

The Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is an international science and education program that connects students, teachers, and scientists through educational activities. The GLOBE program purpose is to strengthen the connection between students and teachers by implementing courses that are being taught in schools and creating ways that facilitate the students’ learning processes. Teachers assist students while collecting and analyzing data. The data is then uploaded onto a worldwide accessible database. The data can be used towards scientists’ research and evaluation of the environment in a largescale manner. This study focused on the implementation of the GLOBE Program in the classrooms of nine New York City public school teachers. Upon becoming
Salame_Sabi_and_Hamid.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [461.4 KB]

A Comparison Study of Liberation Theory and the Ruhi System

Shahla Mehrgani, Baha’i Institute for Higher Education, Iran

This study seeks to understand the similarities and differences between Liberation Theology and the Baha’is current system that is based on the Ruhi System. There are some undeniable similarities between the key principles as well as the elements of these two systems. Both had been revealed during the 60s and the 70s in Colombia, in particular, and Latin America in general. They both suggest that religion is a social construction. Following the feature of constructionism, both suggest that religious activities and the nomos towards their cosmic frame of reference should be based on local and even neighbourhood activities. Both criticise academic theology and praise grassroots theology based on regular believers’ interpretations of the scriptures that happen in the basic churches for li
Mehrgani.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [419.0 KB]

Target Language Development for Immigrant Women: Key to Empowerment, Stability, and Growth

Paula M. Wilder, Durham Technical Community College, US

As a result of political, economic, and social unrest, the number of immigrants living in and moving to the United States and Europe continues to grow (Migration Policy Institute, 2020a; 2020b; National Council on State Legislatures, 2019). Immigrant women are often isolated within monolingual homes and communities as a result of lack of transportation, family responsibilities, cultural and religious limitations. One major factor that creates this isolation is lack of access to education in the target language. Women rely on others to assist with shopping, doctor's appointments, communication about their children's schools, and, if they do work, are disproportionately represented in the service industries as a result of low- or zero-level knowledge of the target language (Haghighi, 2014).
Wilder.P.pdf
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Barriers of Reporting Sexual Violence in Syrian Refugee Camps

Emma MacTavish, University of Birmingham, UK

Barriers of Reporting Sexual Violence in Syrian Refugee Camps
Barriers in reporting sexual violence have emerged as a common problem for refugee camps hosting women. Approaches to increase reporting among women who have experienced sexual violence have not adequately considered the cultural context and what actions would help or hinder Syrian women from reporting sexual gender-based violence.
In a qualitative case study, agencies operating in Vancouver, Canada and Zaatari Camp, Jordan found that Syrian women did not report due to shame, lack of trust in helpers, and a strained legal framework which contributed to non-reporting of sexual violence. With input from agencies helping refugees, this study’s findings suggest that awareness of sexual violence and its consequences need to be directed towards both men and women, to promote the idea that vic
Mactavish.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [446.3 KB]

Should Pornography be Protected by the Constitution of the United States?

Maggie Calvert, Slippery Rock University, US

When pornography is discussed from a Constitutional perspective, conversations often take on a First Amendment lens. The issue is framed as an issue of speech, and since speech is free, pornography cannot be regulated. The simplification of discourse surrounding pornography is a disservice to a society that has been deeply impacted by porn culture. When protected by the guise of free speech, pornography is continually allowed to harm large groups of people, specifically women and people of color. The violence and degradation within pornography continue to increase, and this has begun to create adverse effects on consumers as well. The Constitution should not protect pornography because it violates several amendments, specifically the First Amendment and the Fourteenth Amendment. In this pa
Calvert.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [203.9 KB]

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