Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2009 No 2

The Bail Jurisprudence of Ghana, Namibia, South Africa and Zamibia

Samual Kwesi Amoo, University of Namibia, Namibia

 

The Rich and  the Poor: Eradicating Hunger in a "Global" Economy

Jo Ann Wein, Queensborough College, The City University of New York, US

 

The Activity of the Islamic Order al-Sanūsīyah at the Turn of the 19th Century

Zygmunt Stefan Zalewski, University of Warmia and Mazury, Poland

The Bail Jurisprudence of Ghana, Namibia, South Africa and Zamibia

Samual Kwesi Amoo, University of Namibia, Namibia

Human rights jurisprudence is interdisciplinary, and its advocacy is a universal phenomenon. Human rights encompass civil and political rights as well as economic, social and cultural rights. One right recognized in human rights jurisprudence as pivotal in the promotion of a criminal justice system that satisfies international human rights standards is fair trial, which includes the right to bail. The institution of bail traces its origins to international conventions that protect and guarantee the fundamental rights of the individual to liberty, the presumption of innocence and the due process of the law. These basic international norms and conventions have been internalized in the municipal laws of states. The general pattern of internalization is the incorporation of the basic rights in
Amoo_SK.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [491.2 KB]

The Rich and  the Poor: Eradicating Hunger in a "Global" Economy

Jo Ann Wein, Queensborough College, The City University of New York, US

This paper seeks to bring the Snow-Leavis controversy up-to-date, that is, to apply it to our contemporary world.
The arguments of two contemporary authors, Jeffrey Sachs, The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities of Our Time. New York: Penguin Books, 2005, and David Harvey, A Brief History of Neoliberalism. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005, are played off against one another to illuminate the present situation. Jeffrey Sachs is a Harvard economist who is currently an advisor to Kofi Annan at the United Nations in New York. His book was on the New York Times bestseller list for many weeks when it was first published. David Harvey is an academic who was a professor at Oxford University and the Johns Hopkins University and is currently Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at th
Wein_J.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [341.3 KB]

The Activity of the Islamic Order al-Sanūsīyah at the Turn of the 19th Century

Zygmunt Stefan Zalewski, University of Warmia and Mazury, Poland

Ever since the Suez Canal was opened in 1869, North-Eastern Africa and the Middle East have attracted a great deal of attention. As a consequence of this event, the unavoidable process of rivalry has emerged; mainly between France, Great Britain, Italy and then Germany, after this country had been unified in 1871. The purchasing by the British government 44% shares of the Suez Canal from Egyptian khedive Isma‘īl in November 1875 brought another significant factor which accelerated the challenge for these regions of the world. However, having established its domination over Egypt in 1882, Great Britain intensified the creation of its famous ‘Imperial route’ which facilitated better connections of the Mother country with her vast and remote colonies in India, Australia and the Far Eas
Zalewski_Z.pdf
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