Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2010 No 2

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act: Paving the Way for Equal Pay Claims

Bonnie L. Roach,  Ohio University, US

 

Helping Children Cope through Literature

Danielle F. Lowe,  State University of New York at New Paltz, US

 

The Relationship between Paternal Involvement and Child Outcomes in Male African American Youth

Josef Antonio Passley, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, US

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act: Paving the Way for Equal Pay Claims

Bonnie L. Roach,  Ohio University, US

It is an established fact that more women are entering the labor market and entering a work world which, on the surface, appears to provide equal rights to women workers. Although there are a number of statutory protections against discrimination in the workplace, women are still being paid significantly less than men which results in a loss of many thousands of dollars over a woman’s working life. The answer to this situation would seem to be recovery through litigation, yet the Supreme Court has decided several cases which makes it virtually impossible for a plaintiff to bring a viable Equal Pay claim. The Supreme Court decided that a plaintiff can only bring an Equal Pay claim 180 days after the initial discriminatory decision to pay a female worker differently than her male counte
Roach_B.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [338.6 KB]

Helping Children Cope through Literature

Danielle F. Lowe,  State University of New York at New Paltz, US

As a primary educator, I have witnessed the impact literature can have on a child’s life. Unfortunately, in our society children are exposed to a much higher level of violence, instability, and death than in previous years. In order to assist children through these difficult times, it is best to provide them with an outlet of expression. Bibliotherapy, or therapeutic reading, helps children relate to characters and therefore cope with their emotions. Most readers are looking for a solution to their own personal life situation and feel more at ease when they learn that they are not the “only ones” dealing with this particular life crisis. Until recently, children’s books did not address sensitive topics such as death, divorce, and bullying. In the past few decades and due to soci
Lowe_D.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [341.3 KB]

The Relationship between Paternal Involvement and Child Outcomes in Male African American Youth

Josef Antonio Passley, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, US

Studies have shown that children living in homes without fathers are likely to be subject to more deleterious effects than those in intact families. Few studies, however, have evaluated the specific impact of father absence in prepubescent African American boys in single parent, female-headed homes. This study examined the effects of paternal absence on boys aged 9-12. The results were that, on average, young males who did not reside with a paternal figure evidenced more depression and conduct problems than their counterparts from homes with a male figure. The findings here suggest that efforts are needed to ameliorate the negative effects of the lack of an adult male presence in the home.
Passley_J.doc.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [381.2 KB]

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