Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2013 No 3

Uncivil Society: Incivility and Gender Discrimination as a Barrier to Advancement in American Higher Education

Kathleen Burke, Johns Hopkins University, US

 

Investigating the Experiences of Teachers Using Storytelling

Moira Dougherty, University of Maryland, US

 

Strategic Investment: A Case Study of Payoffs from Targeted University Funding

Susan M. Fritz, and Kristin Yates, University of Nebraska, US

 

The Value of Arts Education in a Global and Technological World

Theresa M. Grupico, Monmouth University, US

 

A Philosopher's Pedagogy: A Three-Part Model for School Betterment

Amber Strong Makaiau, and Benjamin Lukey, University of Hawai'i, US

 

Instruction Through the Lens of Socio-Economic Status: Reflections for Teacher Educators

Twyla T. Miranda, Joe Dryden, William Newton, Carlos A. Martinez, Lisa Dryden, Sandra Hudson Myers, Texas Wesleyan University, US

Uncivil Society: Incivility and Gender Discrimination as a Barrier to Advancement in American Higher Education

Kathleen Burke, Johns Hopkins University, US

American Higher Education, like American politics, has been said to be undergoing a crisis in civility. Recent media interest in the celebrated case of Teresa Sullivan at the University of Virginia has stirred public awareness of the persistence of incivility within American Higher Education. Evidence suggests that the problem is growing as more women attempt to ascend to positions of power with universities. The lack of a large body of research, especially related to the role mediation plays, has been a hindrance to further examining the problem and its effects.

This article examines some of the literature related to incivility as a modern manifestation of gender discrimination affecting women faculty and administrators. The article explores the interplay of the United States’ leg
burke.pdf
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Investigating the Experiences of Teachers Using Storytelling

Moira Dougherty, University of Maryland, US

The focus of this phenomenological research is on understanding the power of storytelling to affect the lives and pedagogical understandings of teachers. In this paper I discuss several of the major themes that emerged from a phenomenological investigation into the lived experiences of five elementary school teachers who began to use storytelling in their classrooms. I draw on the works of numerous storytellers, educators and phenomenologists to provide a ground for this study. Hermeneutic phenomenology is the human science that seeks to uncover and interpret the essential elements that make up phenomena. The framework of this quest is the phenomenological methodology of Max van Manen. Telling stories to their classes helped my participants understand the richness of their pedagogical know
dougherty.pdf
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Strategic Investment: A Case Study of Payoffs from Targeted University Funding

Susan M. Fritz, and Kristin Yates, University of Nebraska, US

For more than a decade most public universities in the U.S. have faced the challenge of continuing to develop new programs or boost existing ones to a new level without significant new resources. A long-term pattern of cuts or limited growth in state appropriations occurred at a time when new and expensive fields in technology and science required investment. At the same time, expanded enrollments meant that core programs also had to be sustained to meet enrollment demands. Limited resources had to be targeted in hopes that modest investments could make significant differences. This case study examines the impact of a Midwestern university system’s efforts over ten years to transform and elevate selected programs on its four campuses through strategic investments. Recurring investment
fritz.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [415.6 KB]

The Value of Arts Education in a Global and Technological World

Theresa M. Grupico, Monmouth University, US

Arts Education is important because firstly, it can improve students’ performance in other classes as well as beyond school. It provides an environment of active and non-punitive learning which can translate into greater interest and participation and higher school retention, as well as building self-esteem and self-confidence. It also fosters development of additional learning skills, such as critical and complex thinking, that can carry over into other classes and beyond.
Arts Education has value not only for what it offers with respect to other disciplines, but also in and of itself. In our increasingly global world, it encourages respect and appreciation for individuality and diversity. In our age of industry, technology and information, it keeps us in touch with our senses. It
grupico.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [281.1 KB]

A Philosopher's Pedagogy: A Three-Part Model for School Betterment

Amber Strong Makaiau, and Benjamin Lukey, University of Hawai'i, US

The pedagogical approaches used in teacher education implicitly shape teachers’ “conceptual orientations towards teaching, learning, and learning to teach” (Grossman 2005, 429). This study explores what happens when the “philosopher’s pedagogy” is used to create a new professional development model in the K-12 setting. The participants are the two authors, university faculty who conduct a self-study as they collaborate with students, teachers, and administrators in the Hawai‘i State public school system to design and implement this new professional development model. Data includes transcripts of the participants planning meetings, electronic communication, workplace documents and personal memos. A constructivist approach to grounded theory methods is used to analyze the data.
Makaiau and Lukey.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [231.2 KB]

Instruction Through the Lens of Socio-Economic Status: Reflections for Teacher Educators

Twyla T. Miranda, Joe Dryden, William Newton, Carlos A. Martinez, Lisa Dryden, Sandra Hudson Myers, Texas Wesleyan University, US

In six third grade classrooms located in schools that ranged from high to low socio-economic status in an urban area of Texas, teacher educators observed social processes as the school year began. Schools were chosen based on Texas Education School Report Card ratings of “acceptable,” and teachers were selected from principal recommendations regarding effective teaching and positive classroom culture. Social processes included ways of discourse and instruction that benefited student learning and classroom culture. Language use included curricular and informal talk, behavior management, philosophical inquiry, shared verbal governance, and specific talk regarding state-mandated tests. Data were collected over six months of observations with follow up interviews with teachers and pr
miranda.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [382.8 KB]

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