Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Vol 2009 No 1

Protecting the Vulnerable from the Vulnerable: Child Protection and Diversity

Michael Cormier, Children's Aid Society of London and Middlesex, London, Ontario, Canada

New wine in Old Wineskins–Twenty-first Century Ethical Challenges for the Just War Tradition

Timothy J. Demy, U.S. Naval War College, US

 

The Obama Presidency and the Question of Social Justice: A Critical Analysis of the Meaningful Milestone

Lawrence J. Hanks, Indiana University, US

Protecting the Vulnerable from the Vulnerable: Child Protection and Diversity

Michael Cormier, Children's Aid Society of London and Middlesex, London, Ontario, Canada

This paper explores some of the issues encountered by governments and government agencies when they attempt to protect children born into minority communities. The experience of the Ontario government and the agencies of the government in dealing with Aboriginal communities is the main vehicle for considering the issues. The paper provides a guide to the legislation, a history of the Aboriginal communities dealing with children and the government attempts to protect children.
The immigrant communities’ experiences with child protection agencies are then considered. The similarity between the Aboriginal experience and the immigrant communities’ experience is analysed. Finally the steps needed to begin dealing with the problems experienced by the government, government agencies, Aborigin
Cormier_M.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [377.7 KB]

New wine in Old Wineskins–Twenty-first Century Ethical Challenges for the Just War Tradition

Timothy J. Demy, U.S. Naval War College, US

Throughout western history the just war tradition has provided philosophers and practitioners of war the prevailing ethical framework for thinking about issues of war, peace, and justice. Although its principles have rarely been fully realized, its tenets established a foundation pertinent to discussions in disciplines such as ethics, law, international relations, political science, and religion. In the twenty-first century new challenges have arisen that question the validity of the just war tradition in an era of globalization and pluralist ethics. Questions regarding the role of military contractors, rise of child soldiers, employment of new technologies, inviolable state sovereignty, and integrated global economics are forcing reevaluations of this ethical model’s continued viability
Demy_TJ.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [435.1 KB]

The Obama Presidency and the Question of Social Justice: A Critical Analysis of the Meaningful Milestone

Lawrence J. Hanks, Indiana University, US

On January 20, 2009, essentially 200 years after the enactment of the embargo against the slave trade, 40 years after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., Barack Hussein Obama became the 44th president of the United States of America. Using the one drop rule for racial designation which has prevailed in the USA for most of its history, America had elected its first black president. Using the new standard created by the U.S. Census Bureau in 2000, America now had its first commonly acknowledged bi-racial president. All can agree that Obama is not “wholly white,”—he is a “man of color” and therein lays the milestone; someone other than a white male was President of the United States of America. Analysts on the right were quick to declare that the U.S. had overcome the ch
Hanks_L.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [330.9 KB]

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