Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2014 No 2

A Response to the Critical Analysis of Religion by Logical Positivism

John H Dreher,  University of Southern California, US

A Response to the Critical Analysis of Religion by Logical Positivism

John H Dreher,  University of Southern California, US

 

Religion, Politics, and Public Discourse: Bruce Springsteen and the Public Church of Rock and Roll

Frederick L. Downing, Valdosta State University,  Jonathan W. Downing, Screaming Shih-Tzu Productions, US

 

Shattering the Illusion of the Disappearance of the Glass Ceiling in Journalism: A case Study Approach to Presenting the Inside Story

Amanda Geary Pate, University of the West of Scotland, UK

 

Climate Change and the Need for New Teacher Education Curriculum in South-East Nigeria for Sustainable Development

Jemimah Ndudi Mbakwem, Imo State University,  Solomon Alison Obih, Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education, Nigeria

 

Impacts of Climate Variability on Water Management in Texas

Ralph A. Wurbs, Texas A&M University, US

A Response to the Critical Analysis of Religion by Logical Positivism

John H Dreher,  University of Southern California, US

Critics of religion during the 1930s claim that religious discourse is at best metaphorical and at worst ‘cognitively meaningless.’ Some sympathetic critics, like the Wittgenstein of the ‘Lecture on Ethics,’ think that religious discourse may be charitably viewed metaphor or simile. Avowed logical positivists like A.J. Ayer argue that the apparent statements of religion are neither true nor false, which is to say that they are not statements at all. On the contrary, Ayer argued that those apparent statements should be construed as mere expressions of emotion or perhaps as injunctions. Much has passed since those early days of the logical positivists, but even now their arguments exert enormous influence on religious scholarship and practice.

This paper argues that logical posi
Dreher.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [811.2 KB]

Religion, Politics, and Public Discourse: Bruce Springsteen and the Public Church of Rock and Roll

Frederick L. Downing, Valdosta State University,  Jonathan W. Downing, Screaming Shih-Tzu Productions, US

The thesis of this paper is that Bruce Springsteen’s art participates in a musical public square in which the outsider can come up close and overhear a dialogue that has been going on for centuries. Following the work of Robert Detweiler on religion and public life, this paper starts from the premise that the bard’s music, like literature, creates a type of public square or a form of public discourse where urgent matters of human survival, like the nature and nurture of a just state, are expressed, a call for social justice can be heard, and faith and hope for the future can be assimilated. Using the theory of Martin Marty on religion and civic life, the paper further describes Springsteen’s work as the creation of a “public church” beyond sectarian demand which is open to all
Downing.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [619.0 KB]

Shattering the Illusion of the Disappearance of the Glass Ceiling in Journalism: A case Study Approach to Presenting the Inside Story

Amanda Geary Pate, University of the West of Scotland, UK

Journalism as a profession is arguably one that has high ideals and principled values at its heart, not least through its function as the fourth estate. However, the media can be reluctant to voluntarily undertake any examination and open dialogue in terms of its own professional practices – particularly in relation to the issue of gender equality and the advancement of women into management roles. This paper will present the findings of an extensive study into gender equality in journalism and challenges the hypotheses of some commentators that the glass ceiling has long since been shattered in media organizations. The methodological approach was influenced by phenomenology, which gives value to the relevance of ‘experience’.

This case study focuses specifically on the profession
Geary Pate.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [771.4 KB]

Climate Change and the Need for New Teacher Education Curriculum in South-East Nigeria for Sustainable Development

Jemimah Ndudi Mbakwem, Imo State University,  Solomon Alison Obih, Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education, Nigeria

The ravages of climate change have become topical global issue that has threatened the sustenance of man and environment. Though a global phenomenon, its deleterious effects such as excessive flooding which breads more mosquitoes and heightens malaria attacks, are evident in Nigeria, a developing country. It does seem that the realities and phenomenon of climate change are not covered in the curriculum of teacher preparation programmes at all levels including primary science health programmes in primary schools. It is therefore pertinent that Nigeria should be part of the global race to combat climate change if her citizens must live in sustainable safe environment. The necessary first step is to review the curriculum of teacher education programmes to introduce climate change since teache
Mbakwem and Obih.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [779.8 KB]

Impacts of Climate Variability on Water Management in Texas

Ralph A. Wurbs, Texas A&M University, US

Water resources management in Texas, like elsewhere, involves allocating extremely variable stream flow among numerous water users within a framework of extensive reservoir storage facilities and other constructed infrastructure and complex institutional mechanisms. Climate change associated with long-term global warming adds to the variability and uncertainties already inherent in managing water resources. Effective water management requires detailed assessments of future water availability and supply reliability. The Texas Water Availability Modeling (WAM) System has greatly contributed to water management in the state. The generalized software and the assessment concepts incorporated in the Texas WAM System are also applicable to other regions of the world.
Wurbs.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [759.1 KB]

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