Journal of Academic Perspectives
Journal of Academic Perspectives

Volume 2010 No. 1

The Invention, Technology and the GI Bill

Robert E. Parkin,  University of Massachusetts, Lowell, US

 

Managing Human Rights and Human Resources: The Dual Responsibility of Global Corporations

Jennifer Palthe,  Western Michigan University, US

The Invention, Technology and the GI Bill

Robert E. Parkin,  University of Massachusetts, Lowell, US

The era of industrialization was also the age of invention, which spurred technology that in turn required skills not provided by existing educational institutions. In particular, the traditional elite higher education centers could not, or would not, provide the training in the numbers needed for a technical and increasingly global economy. The GI Bill in the United States changed this entirely, making higher education available to 2.2 million veterans returning from WW2: few of these had the chance of a university or college education previously. The economic benefits to the United States were immense.
From community college to university, higher education enrollment burgeoned, so that by the new millennium two thirds of high school seniors expected to get a bachelor’s degree. Oth
Parkin_R.doc.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [447.7 KB]

Managing Human Rights and Human Resources: The Dual Responsibility of Global Corporations

Jennifer Palthe,  Western Michigan University, US

At the nexus of global expansion and trade liberalization are humans; their needs, development, and aspirations. Whether local inhabitants of developing nations impacted by global trade, or human resources employed by global corporations to conduct business abroad, the central element remains people. In an age of unprecedented change, the development, deployment, and enhancement of this vital resource cannot be underestimated. It is well recognized that global business success is dependent on the ability of organizations to acquire and develop the best employees from around the world.
People are pivotal to both global corporations’ survival and the wealth of nations. Nothing can be mobilized and no progress can be achieved in the absence of this essential resource. The purpose of t
Palthe_J.doc.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [378.7 KB]

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